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December 17, 2018

What to say back to "Your system sucks."

Rolling-stones
There are still moments out there waiting for the homesteading 3000 manager. The ones where someone in IT who's pretty sure they know better about systems says something like "MPE sucks." Or anything equally glib, dressed up little to hide the ignorance.
 
"MPE sucks" is something like "the Stones were hacks." It’s a matter of taste and what you know. There’s too much legacy software out there doing production work to dismiss anything out of hand. I find that the more technical the IT administrator, the more they seem to like the clean choices, those with shorter pedigrees and clearer parentage. MPE/iX, being in its late 40's of existence, feels like it's just too out of date.
 
If that were true, then a company like Stromasys would have failed at selling an emulator into the MPE/iX marketplace. Charon is working and moving data where it needs to go.
 
I’ve talked for thousands of hours to people who cut code and build application suites. The dance between developer, administrator-CIO, and end user is interesting and frustrating. Using something older is not an ignorant move. What sucks, if anything, is a tunnel vision about the best tool to preserve a company's investment.
 
I've read the following in the last 24 hours, shared by a vendor who really needs you to see that cloud IT is your next best future.
The person in charge of the software isn’t generally involved in the day to day. The only thing they know is that the job is getting done, and “If it ain’t broke, don’t ax it.” They’re too removed to realize that it is broken, and there’s no one questioning them about whether something could be done 20 percent faster or 10 times easier.

Neither of these stakeholders is in a position where they can see the problems. What
they need is a different perspective.

When a different perspective can respect the investment in MPE/iX, and acknowlege how much less faster or easier an alternative is once you factor in the cost of change — then it might be time to talk futures and alternatives
 
People like the tools that they like. I don’t try to win the PC vs Mac debates anymore. It does annoy me to see a tech expert dismiss something. I have a friend who loves Android and slams iOS, who uses Linux and hoots at Windows. For him, the ability to flip a million software switches and manage his own filesystem is the smartest way to go. The 3000 marketplace started to see this when SAP crept in to try to replace MPE/iX. That's why Kenandy has been able to stand in at a few 3000 sites. Its switches are already set in positions that let work get done.
 
Advocates of the more complex choices usually don’t understand how smart they are in relation to everybody else. I encountered this in our editorial business just a few days ago.
A colleague who's a website developer belted out that "Wordpress sucks" stink bomb. To veer into the weeds on editorial and author websites, I'm one of the many who use Wordpress to manage content — blog entries, pages for books or services, and more. Wordpress is classic and yet evolving, and it's everywhere. Some might think of it like a legacy choice. The alternatives for content management are harder to customize. Joomla is that's colleague's favorite. For me, it was the bad, beautiful girlfriend who never felt safe.
 
I tried to make Joomla work for more than three years, but it was impenetrable. Some of that was probably my build-out of its theme, some my unfamiliarity with Joomla (I know WordPress dashboards and plug-ins much better.) I didn’t cut code. I made content and thought up business practices.
 
Keeping a website in clean enough shape to remain useful is not automatic, not in 2018. 
 
It didn’t get better once the Joomla site for the Writer's Workshop got injected with malware scripts. Twice. I changed hosting and got an intermediate firewall company (SiteLock, $60 monthly) to make the security problems go away. 
 
Like an MPE/iX customer who's finding problems with hardware, I had to get my resource chain in order. My new host auto-updates my WordPress (and believe me, I know people are trying to hack into WordPress. It’s everywhere, like Windows) and my new webmaster wants to secure my site as much as I do.
 
Insisting on control and customization — like the MPE/iX customers must, because they're supporting decades of data — makes things stickier. My challenge with website user experience is I learned publishing in the paper era. We controlled every user experience because the medium was the same everywhere. Losing control, and giving myself over the the dynamic nature of web, still annoys me. Three different sizes of smartphones, and two mobile operating systems, plus the vagueries of browsers, alters everyone's the experience.
 
Don't let anybody tell you your legacy choices suck. IT can sing from more than one set of chords.
 

01:58 PM in Homesteading, Migration | Permalink

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