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December 03, 2018

HP 3000 dream tracks close to virtualization

Railroad switches
An HP 9000 HP-UX virtualization product is in development. In that kind of design, a single Intel server with enough computing power (concurrent threads) could host both HP 3000 and HP 9000 virtualizations. HP had the same objective almost 20 years ago for its largest enterprise platforms.

Early in 1999 HP's Harry Sterling spoke at an all-day user meeting in the UK hosted by Riva Systems. Sterling, who'd retire before the end of that year, said a multi-OS server was within HP's vision for the 3000 and 9000 customers.

Sterling’s mentioned the possibility of running MPE, NT and Unix concurrently on the HP 3000 "sometime in the future." There was even the possibility of a “hot-swap” version of MPE alongside the production system. John Dunlop reported for us at the time.

The passing mention indicated that separate processors in one box would be able to run different operating systems. Sterling did suggest that a hot-swap version of MPE might be a valid use, so that there would be some redundancy with the live operating system.

This seemed to lead to the subject of more uptime. From these comments, it’s possible that HP is looking at allowing online changes to a hot-swap system and then just switching it over to achieve the so-called “magic weekend.” This is a system upgrade that occurs seamlessly and transparently to both the users and management.

That would be a dream not realized. Hot-swap didn't make it any further into the customer base than architect discussions. Sterling noted that in 1997 customers expressed concern about the future of the 3000. To counter that feeling and give the customers more confidence, he outlined in 1999 a five-year roadmap for the 3000.

Marketing was on board as well in that year that led to Y2K. It would take another 13 years before a multiple OS host for MPE/iX would emerge.

Marketing Manager Christine Martino told that crowd about HP’s commitment to the 3000 by hiring more MPE engineers and setting up of new centers of expertise. There was also to be a higher investment in training and education. Finally, she stated that HP was running over 650 HP 3000s to power core Hewlett-Packard corporation business applications.

By now it's going to be 20 years on to the promised land of one host for Unix and MPE. A big enough Intel server — and it might well be one that will evoke enterprise iron costs — could do what Sterling proposed before he retired. All it took was the cooperation of HP's engineers to release internals to emulate PA-RISC systems for Unix and MPE/iX. Those are legacy systems by today, but at least there's an independent software vendor to make the twin-OS dream a possibility.

01:28 PM in History, Migration, News Outta HP | Permalink

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