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September 10, 2018

Durable 3000s seek, sometimes find, homes

Computer Museum 918Earlier this month a notice on the 3000-L mailing list tried to match an old HP 3000 with a new home. Joshua Johnson said he's got a Series 918 LX (the absolute bottom on the 9x8 lineup) that's got to go. It's a good bet this server hasn't been running any part of a business since HP left the support arena.

I have a 918LX that's been sitting around for a while that I'd like to get rid of. It worked when it was last shutdown. I think I still have a bunch of ram for it in a box somewhere. Anyone interested?

Then there was a question about where his HP hardware was sitting. "I’m in Providence RI. It sat in a shed for 10 years. When it was shut down it worked fine. I think I have several memory sticks for it as well."

This was a give-away 3000, the kind that goes for sale on the used market at about $700 in the best case. The Series 918 LX weighs enough that the shipping is going to be the biggest part of that free transaction. The 918 was at the bottom of HP's relative performance ratings, 10.0 on a scale where a Series 37 was a 1.0.

Last week we talked with a 3000 developer who witnessed the shutdown of seven N-Class systems. "They were going to throw them away," he said, because the health care provider had followed its app and moved to Unix. He got the rights to an N-Class and talked the broker who took the rest of the orphaned N-Class systems to trade one for an A-Class server. "The power situation was just too great for me to use the N-Class," he said— referring to the hardware's electrical needs, not the horsepower.

Old 3000s seeking new homes is still news in your community. Sometimes the adoptions feel like they're foster homes, though.

HP's 3000 iron was built to extraordinary standards, or there wouldn't be a Series 918 available to give away in Rhode Island. That's a server built while Clinton was President. In an odd piece of comparison, the N-Class system is 60 times more powerful than the Series 918, but at the end of the line, it had just as much value.

The N-Class and A-Class boxes are newer, of course, and that decision to send them to the scrap-heap might have been wasteful. The durable value of these computers isn't in the hardware whose components age every day. It's in MPE and the applications. 

Holding on to old hardware could be one way to prove that MPE/iX has an evaporating value. Being able to move the apps and the OS onto a newer box puts the brakes on that decline. To be fair, lots of elderly 3000s are able to reboot after a long winter's nap. Our developer who got that A-Class also has a Series 967 in his garage. It was powered down for more than two years before it switched on. 

 

08:04 PM in Homesteading, User Reports | Permalink

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