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October 31, 2016

A Scary Kind of October Surprise

Eyes-popping-outJames Byrne, a systems manager at Canadian logistics management firm Harte & Lyne, has reported a hair-raising development at his 3000 shop. A straightforward request to relicense Powerhouse from the MPE/iX version of the software to Linux resulted in an eye-popping quote.

The supplier of the software, Byrne said, has told him they want $300,000 to move the 20-seat license. Byrne noted dryly, "I recently had my decision to move our company away entirely from proprietary software validated in a most dramatic way."

It's always possible, when numbers like this surface on a Powerhouse relicense bid, that the wrong person in the Powerhouse business line has responded to a request for a quote. Byrne reported this exchange on the 3000-L mailing list, but didn't want to name the software vendor of Powerhouse. It used to be Cognos, but that stopped being true many years ago.

In a message of nine years ago, the debut of Powerhouse for Linux seemed tied to the fortunes of Powerhouse for HP-UX.

Cognos continues its ongoing commitment to its PowerHouse customers with the upcoming release of PowerHouse 4GL and PowerHouse Web for Linux. This is a direct port of the industry-leading application development tool that is so successful on other UNIX platforms as well as MPE/iX, OpenVMS, and Windows. User-based pricing for PowerHouse 4GL and PowerHouse Web for Linux is the same as for other UNIX versions. Please contact your Cognos Account Representative for availability.

Byrne said the exchange with the current supplier of Powerhouse licenses ended with a termination of the Harte & Lyne license for the software -- just after he was told the annual support fee for the relicensed copy was going to be $60,000 a year.

Hopes ran high for awhile when Powerhouse became part of the Unicom Systems software and services business early in 2014. The corporation has a long history of serving the mainframe and IBM communities with products. This legacy business might have made Powerhouse an attractive acquisition more than two years ago.

But the product was acquired from Cognos by IBM just a matter of months after the Linux version of Powerhouse emerged. Even 2007, people wanted to say that Powerhouse was past its use-by date. It became easy to find companies using HP 3000s who were sticking with it, of course. The University of Idaho State was a notable installation, a 3000 site that's moved on to other platforms by now.

Quotes like the one mentioned in Byrne's post are a good reason to try to take a step away from a development platform tied to the rosiest days of 3000 data processing. It's not easy, though -- and doing the right thing by a relicense can generate quite the October surprise of a quote.

06:33 PM in Homesteading, Migration | Permalink

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