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July 25, 2016

Even archival 3000s are keeping things aloft

Stromasys makes MPE/iX applications last forever, a mission that some manufacturing suppliers are taking to heart. Doug Smith of the vendor tells a story about a supplier to aircraft manufacturers which puts data from archival 3000s back into production, from time to time.

Doug SmithThese suppliers have moved their production IT to platforms such as SAP, he says. But they haven't retired their HP 3000 data. One reason is the amount of work needed to bring processes onto complex platforms like SAP. Rather than move everything into a new application suite, many companies only move open items. They might need others later. That's where an archival MPE system goes to work.

"SAP is so limited," Smith says. "It’s a structure you must fit into. You have to fit your business to work within SAP, more than SAP working to fit the business. You have to meet the software’s criteria just to move on to the next process, and that’s why it’s so much easier just to move the items that are open. Otherwise, you have re-create all of the substructure you had on the 3000 software. A 10-year project could become a one-year project if you only move the open items. You’re talking about saving millions of dollars."

For example, one aircraft supplier has been building parts for 40 years, work that started when the HP 3000 was brand-new. They didn’t bring all those parts over to their SAP replacement for the MPE/iX applications. "But they can get a call at any time that they need the landing gear for a certain type of aircraft, for example—and they don’t have the part on SAP," Smith says. "So they have to go back to the archive machine to get it processed. It’s not only for regulatory purposes. It’s for serving-the-customer purposes."

"If they haven’t sold a part in a certain number of years," Smith explains, "they say they don’t think they’ll sell it again. But when a customer comes back and wants that part, they’ll be charged a premium because they’re pulling up those components to build the part again. The aircraft can still fly. If they don’t have that information, though, they can’t service their customer."

Archival 3000s with a complete bill of materials can be production assets. It’s a way to keep replacement items open. "You can imagine what an aircraft bill of materials looks like," Smith says. "The list can be 10 parts, or 200,000 parts. Along with that you have assembly instructions, routings, and more, to tell you how to build this part. They call a Stromasys server an archive machine. That's due to the fact that the personnel are changing. The IT staff who are coming in are SAP guys."

09:38 PM in Homesteading | Permalink

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