« Throwback: When IMAGE Got Its SQL Skin | Main | Celebrating a 3000 Celebrity's (im)migration »

July 10, 2015

User group manufactures new website

CAMUS is the Computer Applications for Manufacturing User Society that now has a fresh website to go with its quaint name. While Computer Aided Manufacturing pretty much describes everything outside of the tiny Chinese enterprises doing piecework for the world, CAMUS is unique. It's devoted to a significant interest of the remaining HP 3000 homesteaders. Manufacturing remains an HP 3000 heartland.

Oops HPKeeping a website up to date is no small feat. In the face of declining use of HP 3000-related products, some websites have disappeared. The legendary Jazz server from the Hewlett-Packard labs went dark long ago. The full retreat of HP's 3000 knowledge seems more obvious all the time. The old www.hp.com/go/e3000 address, once HP's portal for things MPE-related, now returns the message above. 

Which is why the camus.org update is heartening. Terri Glendon Lanza reports that the site serves MANMAN, MK, MAXCIM, and migrated manufacturing companies.

Members will now be able to edit their profiles and search the membership for others with similarities such as geographics, software modules and platforms, or associate supplier services.

Our free membership still includes upcoming webinar meetings, connecting with 'birds of a feather', a listserv for questions to the community, and photo gallery of former events.

Society members receive access credentials to a members-only section. Just about anybody can become a member. Pivital Solutions and Stromasys are Associate members, which will tell you about the 3000 focus the group can count upon.

01:06 PM in Homesteading, Web Resources | Permalink

Bookmark and Share

Use our search engine to find 20 years
of HP 3000 news and articles

Comments

Comments

Where there is life, there is hope, I say!!!!

Posted by: Tim | Jul 13, 2015 4:43:54 PM

This may be the groundswell that propels MPE/iX back from obscurity towards prominence as a hardware-specific operating system that hosts Linux shells and environments.

Linux could run in a virtual shell on top of MPE/iX, which would insulate the core OS and its constituent hardware from attack. This might be the biggest virtualization news to not come out of Cupertino in a long time! Note this is the approach that IBM takes with its System Z. It hosts various Linuxes, but the core OS remains an IBM one.

The core OS can be simply a virtualization manager, or it can also host its own applications. So customers get the best of both worlds: they keep their MPE/iX apps if they want, they get Linux capability, and they get the security and integrity provided by an excellent OS which ultimately manages the hardware, e.g. disk storage.

Posted by: Tim | Jul 13, 2015 4:51:28 PM

The comments to this entry are closed.