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February 27, 2015

Dow hits record while HP shares fall out

On the day the Dow Jones Industrial Average reached a record pinnacle, Hewlett-Packard released quarterly results that pushed the company's stock down 10 percent.

HP Revenue Chart 2014-15HP is no longer in the Dow, a revision that the New York Stock Exchange made last year. HP is revising its organization this year in preparing to split in two by October. The numbers from HP's Q1 of 2015 indicate the split can't happen soon enough for the maker of servers targeted to replace HP 3000s. The company is marching toward a future more focused on enterprise systems -- but like a trooper on a hard course, HP fell out during the last 90 days.

HP said that the weakness in the US Dollar accounted for its overall 5 percent drop in sales compared to last year's first quarter. Sales would have only fallen 2 percent on a constant-currency basis, the company said. It mentioned the word "currency" 55 times in just its prepared marks of an earnings conference call this week. The 26.8 billion in sales were off by $1.3 billion on the quarter, a period where HP managed to post $1.7 billion in pre-tax earnings. 

That $1.7 billion is a far cry from Apple's $18 billion in its latest quarter profits. HP's arch-rival IBM is partnering with Apple on enterprise-caliber deals.

Meanwhile, the still-combined Hewlett-Packard has rolled from stalled to declining over the last 18 months, which represents some of the reason for its bold move to split itself. "Enterprise trends are set to remain lackluster absent a transformative acquisition," said one analyst while speaking to MarketWatch this week. Two-thirds of the $5.5 billion in Printing came from supplies. Ink is still king in the printing group

Industry Standard Systems (Intel-based Windows servers) provided the lone uptick in the report. Sales of products such as the newest Gen9 ProLiants lifted the revenues up 7 percent compared to the Q1 of 2014. HP is ready to take advantage of upcoming rollovers in Windows Server installations.

Enterprise Group results Q1 15Results from the Enterprise Group delivered another chorus of downbeat numbers for the Business Critical Systems operations. The group where HP's Unix and VMS enterprise servers are created saw its sales fall 9 percent from last year's Q1. Of course, that period showed a revenue drop as well. BCS operations -- where the HP 3000 resided when it was a Hewlett-Packard product -- haven't seen any recovery in more than two years.

BCS results have been so consistently poor that HP considered that 9 percent drop a good sign. "We also saw some recovery in business-critical systems," said CFO Cathie Lesjak, "with revenue down only 7 percent in constant currency or 9 percent as reported."

Lesjak pointed out to the analysts on its conference call that hardware such as the Integrity HP-UX servers are vulnerable to the value of the US Dollar.

Our personal systems and our Enterprise Group hardware businesses have very little in natural hedges, as our component contracts are typically in US dollars. As a result, these businesses are disproportionately impacted by currency movements. However, we do have some ability to increase pricing in response to currency movements, while being mindful of competition and potential negative impacts to customer demand.

HP is expecting all of the 2015 hardware growth in the Enterprise Group to come from its Gen9 lineup of ProLiant systems. Windows Server 2003 has an expiration date for its support coming up in July, an event that HP believes will give it some fresh wind in its enterprise sales.

"I think we are really well positioned to take advantage of Windows 2003 refresh, just as we were from the XP migration and the PC business," said CEO Meg Whitman. "I think we feel really pretty good about that business for the reminder of the year. And I think we are very well positioned .and the Gen9 server was dead-on, from the market perspective."

06:15 PM in Migration, News Outta HP, Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 26, 2015

Not a good night to news — a new morning

Red BoltLast week on this day we announced we're going all-digital with HP 3000 news. So what follows here is not a good night to publishing, but a good morning. Early each day I trek to my Mac and open a digital version of our Austin newspaper. We make coffees and print out the day’s crossword and number puzzles, using the digital American-Statesman. Abby I write on these two pieces of paper, front and back, because it’s the classic way to solve puzzles. But the rest of the day’s news and features arrive digitally. We can even follow our beloved Spurs with a digital version of the San Antonio paper, scanning an app from our iPads.

We discovered that we don’t miss the big, folded pages that landed on our driveway, the often-unread broadsheets that piled up under the coffee table. I hope you won’t miss those mailed pages of ours too much. Paper is holding its own in the book publishing world, yes. The latest numbers show 635 million printed books sold in 2014, a slim 2 percent rise over 2013.

But this is the news, periodical pages whose mailed delivery period is usually measured in days. A tour of publications that quit print in the past year or two is in order. We start with the most recent retirement, Macworld. Its final print issue mailed last fall — now all-digital. It sells what it is calling “digitally-remastered” articles, something aimed at iPad readers. The subscription cost has even increased.

How about some venerable newsweeklies, like US News & World Report and Newsweek? Both still serve stories from lively websites. Their stalwart competitor Time still sits on waiting room tables and newsstands, though. But just 48 pages of print is the norm for that weekly.

Some publications in our own 3000 world pulled their plug too early, or too late, to deliver a digital generation.

In our world, Interact magazine and its cousin HP World stayed too long at the fair and collapsed along with the user group Interex. HP Professional, HP Omni, HP User — all made their exit before digital rose up as a vibrant publishing outlet. PC World evolved to digital in 2013, after printing 750,000 copies a month in 2006. That’s a lot of pulped trees being sacrificed for the needs of that publication’s advertisers.

The advertisers, our sponsors, made the NewsWire a success. We began our ongoing journey with the ideal of making subscriptions the biggest part of our business model. But the printed trade journals of the 1990s made short work of that idea. Readers were avid, yes, but unwilling to pay in great numbers.

Sponsors like ours stepped up to tap that readership with support for our pages, whether in print or on the Web. There have been more than 210 companies who have made our 8 million printed pages possible, so far. Our final printed issue, Winter 2015, has pages sponsored by the most stalwart and steady. Others are already all-digital sponsors. Some support us simply to ensure the 3000 has a digital outpost.

More than 19 years of printing and mailing pages is what your community and all those sponsors enabled. There are digital editions in our future and yours. The community continues to require the vantage point of a publication, a place to discover stories about themselves.

Some stout espresso and sharp pencils start most days around my house. Finding what’s new, and chronicling it in a story, remains fun and useful creation. The early morning's spark and the durable magic of email, plus the Web, helped us create the NewsWire’s print. Now it’s our time to spark the rest of our ride using our digital bolt.

09:21 PM in Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 25, 2015

Clouds to strip dongle from Charon servers

A physical dongle has been required up to now, but the new Stromasys Charon-HPA licenses for MPE will be designed to use software-only verification. Applications will still be matched against HPSUSAN to prevent any kind of fraud.

Cloud thumb drive“We are moving toward a software license,” said Alexandre Cruz, Stromasys Sales Engineer. “This will prevent any licensing problems that might occur while using a cloud provider. We will create a machine for licensing purposes which has exactly the same structure as a USB dongle. We still require the HPSUSAN and the HPCPUNAME.”

“We finished the testing and we’ve already discussed it for a couple of customers. I have deployed it myself for testing. These customers have not started to use virtualization for their HP 3000s, but we are proposing that they use the cloud instead of a physical server.”

Cruz said that the use of licensing dongles has not been limited to the HP 3000 version of Charon. All of the emulator products from Stromasys have required this type of device for verification of licenses. 

“Our next installations will tend to be dongle-free,” he said. “In the future, when there are renewals, we are planning to replace the USB dongle with a software-based license. When we go to renewal, the customers can get rid of the dongle easily.”

Subscriptions are being sold for Charon HPA on a yearly basis, in either single-year or three-year periods. Licenses would be paid in advance with renewals every year. “This means that every 12 months they have the possibility to stop everything without losing what they have invested in the hardware,” Cruz said.

“We are trying to make it easier and more flexible. We are encouraging our customers to use their own cloud provider. If they do not have a preferred cloud partner, then we can recommend one for their system. We don’t have a current contract established with any specific providers.”

The company has used Rackspace for demonstration and testing purposes. “Rackspace has the flexibility to provide us with the systems we want. The other cloud providers are a little bit closed on their offers,” Cruz said. “They have standard machines, say four cores, 16GB of RAM, 400 GB of disk. For some customers, this might be a little bit on the low side. With Rackspace we have the ability to tell them that ‘we need a system with the following specifications.’ 

"We did research on several providers, and the relationship of costs and benefits led us toward Rackspace."

Virtualizing an N-Class on high end, for example, “would not even fall into the high end of the systems from many cloud providers. Their normal systems that are provided are quite slow. Most of the time, the big cloud players tend to be a little anemic in their offerings.”

Stromasys also talked to Rackspace about security. “Besides their intense monitoring for intrusion detection, we tested how we could connect to their systems in a more secure way,” Cruz said. “We used a mixture of SSH on the Linux connection side, instead of a normal telnet, and from that point onward it will be forwarded to a specific port to the 3000 system itself. We treat this like a connection to the emulator itself, instead of a normal telnet session.”

If the demand for this cloud product grows, Cruz said that his company “will have the cloud provider implement other forms of security — via some kind of access token that can provide us an extra layer of protection.”

08:18 PM in Homesteading | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 23, 2015

Rackspace lines up for MPE cloud Charon

Stromasys has started to offer cloud-based versions of its HP 3000 virtualized server, after successful tests using Rackspace as a cloud provider. The software solution’s total ownership cost will drop as a result, according to company officials.

Rackspace cloudThe Charon HPA virtualization system is also being sold at an entry-level price of $9,000, according to Razvan Mazilu, Global Head of Presales and Services. That price point delivers an A400 level of performance with eight simultaneous connections.

“The price range for our solutions goes from $9,000 for the HPA/A408D to $99,000 for the HPA/N4040,” he said.

Deploying that software in a cloud setting is still in early stages, now that the testing was completed in November. Stromasys says customers can use their own cloud providers, or Stromasys can recommend a provider as robust as Rackspace.

“This is a brand-new feature that we are implementing,” Mazilu said. “We are talking to a couple of new customers about this, and so it’s on the table, rather than hosting their own systems at their site. Remote sales people, for example, don’t have to go to the office.”

“A customer doesn’t have to create a remote access infrastructure to provide users with access to the systems. This removes the boundaries from the systems. Since the 3000s are usually quite old, they tend to be forgotten when it comes to providing remote access to them.”

By going with a cloud installation, “they do not need to invest in the day-to-day operations and maintenance, either,” said Alexandre Cruz, Stromasys Sales Engineer. Cruz has been in close contact with the HP 3000 customers using Charon. He added that  “being on a contract with a cloud provider, they can cancel at any time.” 

Implementing the cloud version of Charon on Rackspace showed no decline in performance, Cruz said. “I had a very big pipe, 250 megabits, and that’s not the top of the top-end for systems. We can improve on the network speed if needed.”

06:10 AM in Homesteading, Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 20, 2015

Turning the Page on Paper News

We always knew that digital delivery was part of The 3000 NewsWire mission. We branded our publication with the word “wire” because that’s what the world understood in 1995 about anything beyond printed information. 

Closing in on 20 years later, it’s time to unplug from print. The change has been inevitable, a lot like many changes for the 3000 community’s members. It also mirrors the way information and content moves today: virtually without wires.

News bundlesIn the year that my wife Abby and I started the NewsWire, using wires was essential to staying connected. Our computers were wired to the network, the modem wired to the computer. Our music came to us over a CD player wired up to a stereo receiver, and the receiver was wired to our big honking speakers.

Today it’s all wireless, and starting after this month's Winter issue, just mailed, we’ll be all paperless. Our music and computing has gained flexibility and speed while it shed its wires. Going paperless and wireless amount to the same thing: embracing a new, fluid future for what we need.

When I started writing this news resource, I had to be connected via wires just to make a paper product. Now we can send and receive information with no wires to speak of, except for those in the datacenters where our information is stored and exchanged. The laptop is wireless, tablets and phones are wire-free. So can build on what we’ve shared for close to 20 years using no paper. Even the invoicing has gone all-digital.

We still love paper here. There’s no future that I can see where paper won’t be a special medium for consuming and enjoying some stories. But for news, and things that evolve, digital delivery is the flexible choice for 2015 and beyond.

No, this isn’t our end-of-life notice. But after more than 8 million mailed pages since 1995, we can go farther with digital delivery.

The world of the NewsWire beyond print is just as real as the years of 3000 life after the Hewlett-Packard announcement of 2001. We’ve printed far more issues and dispensed more news since the week of that November notice than before it. For 13 years afterward, print issues of the NewsWire have rolled off a press. Instead, this transition for us is a total commitment to what’s been our primary medium for more than nine years.

Our print issue readers have been enjoying and archiving paper copies since before there was Google, Amazon, or Apple’s iPod. We’re just following the lead of countless news outlets who’ve transcended their boundaries of column inches and the limits of page counts that they had to bind within covers.

Print has been important, so crucial to our work that growing into this moment never would have been possible without the many pages mailed across three different decades. By our accounting, we’ve sent more than 8.5 million pages into worldwide postal systems, as well as distributed at shows, since the year when Lew Platt was a new CEO at HP.

When Abby and I launched this venture during the prior century, no digital-only information resource could be taken seriously. A website? You had to be more than that. After more than a generation, the picture has flipped — enough that an evolution to all-digital confirms the view that what’s important is what’s written and shown, regardless of its medium.

It’s a transition that’s akin to what the 3000 is going through this year and beyond, as the aging HP hardware starts to cross over into cloud virtualization. We once needed print as much as MPE needed PA-RISC chips. Now each is a throwback. Your market still wants to look forward.

Even with all of that certain strategy, this was not an easy step to take. Abby and I grew our careers in the era of printed publishing. The smell of fresh ink on crisp paper — whether it was newsprint like the tabloids such as the HP Chronicle where I started, or the 60-pound white stock of the NewsWire — still triggers a rising heartbeat and a tug at heartstrings.

When we rolled off the press in 1995, we loved paper as much as we loved immediacy, the certainty that we offered as much as anyone could know on the day we printed. Just as we shipped off Issue No. 1, we created the FlashPaper, a last-minute roundup of the latest 3000 reports on a stuffed-in, goldenrod-colored sheet. Not long after that, we went to e-mail delivery of other stories in an Online Extra. It’s been a great ride to push the paper this far.

12:46 PM in Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 19, 2015

NewsWire Goes Green

After almost 20 years of reporting news and technology updates using our printed issues, The 3000 NewsWire goes to an all-digital format following this month's Winter 2015 print issue. It's our 153rd, and this announcement marks our new focus on delivering information exclusively online.

This is not a farewell. We're only saying goodbye to our paper and ink.

Blog Circle Winter15The articles and papers published on this blog will continue to update and inform the MPE community. After racking up more than nine years of digital publishing, this blog now has more than 2,500 articles, including video, podcasts, and color digital images from resources around the world. We have immediate response capabilities, and rapid updating. We have a wide array of media to tell the stories going forward from 2015.

Eco-friendlyIt’s the reach of our Web outlet that enables the strategy to take the NewsWire all-digital, also reducing the publication’s eco-footprint. Online resources go back to 1996. We'll take special care to bring forward everything that remains useful.

The first paper issue of The 3000 NewsWire appeared in August of 1995 at that year’s Interex conference in Toronto. We hand-carried a four-page pilot issue to Interex '95. To introduce the fresh newsletter to the marketplace, HP announced our rollout during its TV news broadcast 3K Today.

Throughout our publication’s history, the Web has offered a growing option for news distribution. After websites became the primary means for news dissemination, in 2005 this blog took over as our primary outlet for reports. The quarterly print issues across the last two decades have summed up the greatest hits of these reports, each covering the prior three-month period.

The blog now becomes the exclusive source for updated 3000-related news and market updates. But there will continue to be digital editions of the NewsWire, edited and curated for our readers in PDF formats. This new Digital Focus product will offer fine-tuned searching capability. The dizzy array of outside weblinks will fall away in a Digital Focus PDF compilation. And creating PDFs for passing on our articles will be easier, too.

Our daily updates for new articles are available via Twitter by following @3000newswire. We've had an RSS digital feed for almost 10 years by now, too.

We're working on evolving our presentation while we go green in 2015. We'd love to hear from you about our growing digital development, and what you'd like to see in this new year.

04:41 PM in Homesteading, Migration, Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 18, 2015

How 3000s Bridge to IPv6: Outside Systems

By Brian Edminster
Applied Technologies

As great at it would be to see, it really doesn't matter if MPE/iX's network software is never updated to natively handle IPv6 addresses Here's why.

Golden Gate BridgeHP 3000s are rarely the only computer system in a datacenter. There's almost always some other system to handle DNS and email and file-serving (although our beloved systems can serve these functions) — to say nothing of firewalls and switches and routers that shield our systems from unwanted accesses, while optimizing the flow of information that we do want to occur. 

These other systems (especially the firewalls and routers) are going to be the network access salvation for our legacy systems. That’s because many can, or will, provide bridging between IPv6 and IPv4 address spaces.

And not yet discussed, but even more important, is that in the long run Hewlett-Packard’s HP-PA iron won't be hosting MPE/iX.  It'll be running in an emulator (The Stromasys Charon-HPA, as of now) emulation that is hosted on hardware and under an OS that does support IPv6.

In short — the emulator's iron and hosting OS will provide the IPv6 to IPv4 translation, allowing the network that surrounds it to be entirely IPv6.

I can't say for sure if anyone's tried this approach, but if they haven't at least planned on it yet, Stromasys might want to put this on their to-do list. 

One more thing. Anybody that's feeling pushed to migrate or replace an MPE/iX-based application, just because of worries about IPv6, is being driven by Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt. And I'm willing to bet that the FUD is being supplied by any number of parties that have other things to sell, too. It's like a forensic accounting friend of mine used to say. "If you want to know what's really going on, follow the money."

04:52 PM in Homesteading | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 17, 2015

Big IP addresses not un-docking 3000s yet

Four years ago this month we reported that it was time to get ready for the bigger-scale network addresses called IPv6. In that year, the Internet was reported to have run out of the IPv4 addresses, which was the impetus to create the larger IP numbers. It also seemed like the HP 3000's inability to address IPv6 was going to be one of those sparks to getting migrated off the system.

Docker_(container_engine)_logoBut despite a lack of resources -- which would have been OpenMPE volunteers -- it looks like IPv6 hasn't hemmed in the 3000 from continued service. Now the open source project called Docker has a new 1.5 release, one that aims to bring these bigger IP addresses to more systems. Open source, of course, means Docker might even be of some help to the 3000s that need to be in control of network addresses.

The IPv6 protocol was among those OpenMPE considered when it applied for its license for MPE/iX source. It was suggested back in 2008 that a contract project might revise the 3000's networking to accommodate the new protocol.

As we surmised four years ago, native support for IPv6 networking hasn't been the deal-breaker some 3000 experts expected. Although HP prepared the 3000 to do DNS service, the vendor didn't build a patch in 2009 to eliminate a security hole in DNS for MPE/iX. That's bedrock technology for Internet protocols, so it would have to be made secure. Much of this kind of routing for 3000 shops takes place on external PC systems today.

Making old dogs do new tricks has been demonstrated on Windows. You can even make an older Windows XP box do IPv6, according to Paul Edwards, a former OpenMPE director who's been a training resource for the 3000 community for decades.

Four years ago, while Windows XP was still running at many sites, Edwards showed how to make an old system adopt the new protocol.

You may have heard the news: the world officially runs out of IPv4 addresses this month. But never fear. IPv6 is here... well, sort of. 

Many companies are converting their networks to IPv6 now,  and Windows 7 comes with built in support, but what about those who are still using Windows XP? Luckily, it’s easy to install the IPv6 protocol on your XP machine. Here’s how: 

1. Click Start | Run 
2. Type cmd to open the command prompt window.  
3. At the prompt, type netsh and press ENTER  
4. Type interface and press ENTER 
5. Type ipv6 and press ENTER 
6. Type install and press ENTER 
This installs IPv6. You can confirm that’s been installed by typing, at the command prompt, ipconfig /all. 

You should see an entry under your Local Area Connection that says “Link-local IPv6 Address”  and shows a hexadecimal number, separated by colons. That’s your IPv6 address.

Last fall, our contributor and 3000 consultant Brian Edminster said Docker looks like tech that could help put 3000s into the cloud, too. "Docker struck me as an easy mechanism to stand up Linux instances in the cloud -- any number of different clouds, actually," Edminster said. According to a Wiki article Edminster pointed at, Docker is based upon open source software, the sort of solution he's been tracking for MPE users for many years.

Docker is an open-source project that automates the deployment of applications inside software containers, the Wiki article reports, "thus providing an additional layer of abstraction and automation of operating system-level virtualization on Linux. Docker uses resource isolation features of the Linux kernel such as cgroups and kernel namespaces to allow independent "containers" to run within a single Linux instance, avoiding the overhead of starting virtual machines." 

08:25 PM in Homesteading, Migration | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 16, 2015

Classic MPE tips: Tar, kills, and job advice

How do I use the tar utility to put data onto tape on an HP 3000?

1) Create a tape node

:MKNOD “/dev/tape c 0 7”

2) Enter posix shell

:SH -L

3) Mount a blank tape and enter the tar command

shell/ix>tar -cvf /dev/tape /ACCOUNT/GROUP/FILENAME

How can I determine the validity of an SLT tape?

Use CHECKSLT.MPEXL.TELESUP option 1.

What is the command to abort a hung session? I tried ABORTJOB #s3456. I seem to remember there is a command that will do more.

You can use =SHUTDOWN. But seriously, there is a chance that if it is a network connection, NSCONTROL KILLSESS=#S3456 will work. If it is a serial DTC connection, ABORTIO on the LDEV should work. Finally, depending upon what level of the OS you are on, look into the ABORTPROC command. This might help as a last resort.

I recently had a perfect application for the NEWJOBQ feature. We have two groups of users. One group submits jobs that take about 30 seconds each. Typical jobs for the other group take about 5 minutes each. So I thought I’d give the second group of users their own job queue.

NEWJOBQ ALTJOBQ;LIMIT=1
LIMIT 1 (for HPSYSJOBQ)

When I submit a long job into the ALTJOBQ queue, and a quick job into the default job queue, the second job goes into the WAIT state. Why?

Your NEWJOBQ statement is correct, but your second statement didn’t do what you thought. To put a limit of one on the HPSYSJQ job queue, your statement should read 
:LIMIT 1;JOBQ=HPSYSJQ.

By saying :LIMIT 1, you are changing the total job limit on the system to one. Since the total limit is one, and the long job in ALTJOBQ is still running, the second job waits even though he is the only job in his queue.

What does HPSWINFO.PUB.SYS show? All software or only installed software? How do I find out what HP software is installed?

Generally speaking, HPSWINFO.PUB.SYS is a record of system software level and patching activity. If you want information on HP software installed then you want to run psswinvp.

How can I sync the time on my 3000 with my Windows network? The PC side does regular, automated sync to NIST.

First, ensure your timezone is absolutely correct (:setclock/:showclock) and you have a system logon UDC to setvar TZ to the correct timezone.

Install NTP and use the ‘ntpdate’ function to sync your clock to the PC servers. Do this in a batch job that issues the ntpdate command, and then :STREAMs itself;IN=xx to periodically perform the synchronization.

11:15 PM in Hidden Value, Homesteading | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 13, 2015

It's become data mart season for retailers

This second month of the new year is the first full month for changes to retailer or e-tailer enterprises. While the HP 3000 is scarcely involved in retail IT, the e-tail aspects of the industry triggered the fastest growth in the installed base. That was during the dot-com boom of the late 1990s, when Ecometry fielded so much growth that it represented more than half of the new HP 3000 installations.

BuddingThe nature of e-tailing is built around holidays, so the last three months of each year, and much of January, see few changes to IT operations. But now it's a data mart month for these enterprises. Marts have been around a very long time, well back into those 1990s. A mart is a subset of a data warehouse, and the mart has established itself as fundamental database technology.

In the e-tailer sector where 3000s still operate, new data insights are much prized. Catalogs started these businesses, and by now there's a gold standard to capturing customer dollars based on data analysis. The discount website Zulily measures customer interaction on a per-transaction basis, then tunes the landing pages to fit what a customer's shown interest in during prior visits. That's the kind of insight that demands a serious data mart strategy.

Most e-tailers, the kind of 3000 user that does e-commerce, are not that sophisticated. For those Ecometry sites with requirements that outstrip that software suite, Ability Commerce has add-ons like an order management system. For data mart setups, these sites can rely on MB Foster, according to its CEO Birket Foster. Ability and MB Foster are in a new partnership for this data mart season.

"Ability has complementary products to the Ecometry system," Foster said, "but they also can replace the Ecometry system. We, on the other hand, do work on putting together data marts for retail. We expect there will be an opportunity for us to have a chat about how a data mart might work for these people."

These e-tailing sites are just now getting to look at the most recent Ecometry strategy from last June, Foster added. It's a prime time for plans to form up and migrations to proceed. With every migration, data has to move. That's what a big online movie vendor learned last year.

TLA Video (Theatre for the Living Arts) migrated off  Ecometry (now known as JDA Direct Commerce) and onto Ability’s Order Management System last summer. TLA ran the MPE version of Ecometry. “We had been looking to get off the MPE Ecometry platform," said Eric Moore, Chief Technology Officer at TLA, "and Ability gave us the best package for that.”

Ability acknowledges they're replacing a superior software suite, "one of the top backend ERP platforms for ecommerce and catalog companies in the industry."  TLA's Moore said that the migration demanded that "Ability would help us streamline the movement of data between our various systems."

That's the heartland set of practices that's made MB Foster an Ability partner for 2015 and beyond. "These months [up through March] will determine how many people are moving, and how many people are going to find something else. When they're in season — well, at Vermont Country stores the IT manager said during the morning he was on the phone lines in the call center, and in the afternoon he worked in shipping. He told me, 'My job is just to make sure IT doesn't fail during that in-season process.' Extra staff is needed, and it's not uncommon in smaller companies."

In season, this manager is not allowed to change anything in IT, just keep what's running alive. At Vermont Country Stores, the absolute lockdown date is October 15. That means any migration that gets a greenlight this spring has to be completed in less than nine months. It's a schedule that demands experience and proven tools.

"There's a synergy between Ability and us because we have an expertise in moving systems and integrating data marts," Foster said. He notes that JDA transferred its Statements of Work they were doing to Ability Commerce. "JDA won't do any [Ecometry] statements of work now, unless it's a major revamp that the customer will pay for. JDA is doing with PCI [credit card security] assignments for customers, because if you had to do that certification yourself, you'd spend up to $300,000 to hire an independent third party. Two dozen customers might only pay $100,000 each for PCI compliance services. People pay for that support." But less than willingly.

Since other areas of functionality aren't being addressed for smaller customers, there's an opportunity for vendors like Ability and MB Foster to help improve the Ecometry experience. Or lift the customers into a newer, more facile suite like Ability's software.

"We offer something Ability doesn't, the data marts," Foster said. Both companies offer professional services, and Ability is staffed with people from the old Ecometry organization. "There's a lot of Ability Commerce customers who were, or perhaps still are, Ecometry sites," Foster said. Ability Commerce customers like American Musical Supply, Brookstone, Casual Male, Cornerstone — all either current or former 3000 sites — these are the kinds of properties, as the ecommerce sites are called, that are in the season for data marts and migrations.

"To move things ahead in their IT, they have to do some things," Foster said. "We have the experience to be able to pull data around and move it to the places it needs to be."

08:21 PM in Migration | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 12, 2015

TBT: Sure, there's 20 more years of the 3000

Osaka Feb 93 p1New general manager Glenn Osaka felt confident about the 3000's useful life out to 2013 in this 1993 article from the HP Chronicle. (Click for pop-up details.)

Just 22 years ago this month, the leader of the HP 3000 division figured HP would still be selling and supporting HP 3000s working in businesses today. Glenn Osaka was in his first few months running what HP called CSY, a group that was coming up hard against HP's own Unix sales force.

"I think there's another 20 years in it," he said in 1993, "but I can tell you that 20 years from now, we'll probably look back and the 3000 won't be looking at all like it looks today."

Nobody could see a virtualized server looking like HP's proprietary hardware. PA-RISC computing was just becoming dominant. In 1993 there was no serious emulation in enterprise servers, let alone virtualization. The magic of Charon had not even dawned for the Digital servers where the Stromasys product notched its first success.

But HP was thinking big in that February. Osaka said the 3000 was about to take on "applications that traditionally  would have been thought of as IBM mainframe-class applications. That program is going gangbusters for us. To get that new business on the high end of the product line is very effective for us, because it's the most profitable business we can do. More and more of our new business is going to come from people who are coming from mainframes."

The division was posting annual growth of 5-10 percent, which might have been impressive until HP compared it to 40 percent annual growth in its Unix line.

In a year when HP was just introducing a Unix-like Posix interface to MPE, Osaka said HP's "work that we're doing on Unix is very easily leveraged to the 3000, and we're simply using our sales force to help us find the opportunities to bring it to market first." 

He identified the newest generation of the 3000's database as "SQL for IMAGE," something that would help with relationships with partners like Cognos, Gupta Technologies, PowerSoft and more. What HP would call IMAGE/SQL "will give our customers access to these partners' tools without having to change their database management system." A new client-server solutions program was afoot at HP, and the 3000 was being included on a later schedule than the HP 9000 Unix servers.

The server would "carve itself a nice, comfortable niche in some of the spaces we don't even really conceive of today, particularly in transaction-based processing." Osaka would hold the job until 1995, when he'd become the head of the Computer Systems Business Unit at HP. By that time, he'd guessed, HP would still be able to show its customers that "the level of capability that we provide on the 3000 is higher" than HP Unix servers.

By the time we interviewed Osaka three years later, in a new post in 1996, he'd dialed back his forecast to say "we have at least 10 more years of very strong presence in large companies and medium sized companies with the 3000 in the marketplace. What I don't know is what people are going to buy. For a long time I have had as a core belief that the life of any computer is tied to the lifespan of the application."

But by 1996, with his unit containing both Unix and MPE divisions, Osaka was giving us at the NewsWire the first notes of warning that things had changed for the server inside HP. In our September 1996 Q&A, he said new applications ought to be launched on other platforms.

The whole dynamics around the application software industry have changed. Because of Microsoft, it's turning into a volume marketplace, and there's not enough volume in the 3000 business to fuel the early growth of such companies. If I were a developer, depending on what kind of application, I'd say put it on Oracle, or Informix, or NT BackOffice. Then I'd feel more comfortable I'd get a return.

You're making us glad we didn't ask you about the NewsWire's chances when we started.

The NewsWire is an interesting thing. Information that is critical to this user community has high value, because HP has become less effective at delivering that information to the broad user base. That's a viable business plan, but there are others [in this market] that people talk to me about that don't quite make so much sense.

We left that interview feeling lucky to have pushed out our first year of a publication that was doing what HP couldn't do so well anymore. We'd also be facing the hard reality, within five years, that HP couldn't manage a belief in any future role for the server beyond 2006.

Osaka left HP within two years of our second interview, moving on eventually to Juniper Networks and other high-tech firms. Today he's a private consultant and advisor. Of his work in the 3000 division, MB Foster's Birket Foster says on Linked In

Glenn provided leadership and "out-of-the-box" thinking when running the CSY division. Glenn saw value in the software vendor community, completing solutions for mutual customers. Glenn assisted the formalization of the SIG SoftVend meetings, to exchange directions with software vendors and facilitated non-disclosure meetings for access to MPE source, and working with tool/utility software vendors.

09:37 PM in History, News Outta HP | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 11, 2015

ERP that goes places that are invisible

A webinar briefing this week on data transfer technologies and application portfolios included a new phrase: Going Cloud. It sounded like the ideal of going green for paper-based enterprises, or moving away from something that once served its purpose well. One of the providers of a migration replacement package for 3000 manufacturing users suggests it's high time to consider the unseen potential of the cloud as a place that ERP can go.

Green_cloudIn a blog post called Cloud ERP: Inertia Is Not An Option, a technologist at the ERP vendor Kenandy touts an analyst's white paper that says there are "increasingly credible alternatives to the old line behemoths,” and giving Kenandy as an example. The white paper by Cindy Jutras of ERP consultants Mint Jutras is titled Next Generation ERP: Kenandy's Approach. It makes a case for why an HP 3000 stalwart like MANMAN, built by ASK in the 1970s, is ready for a trip to the cloud.

Kenandy needs to actively engage not only with its prospects, but also its customers. For that type of engagement, it needs to build an active community.

This was something Sandy Kurtzig’s prior company ASK was very good at – so good in fact that the MANMAN community has outlived the company and lives on even today. Can Kenandy replicate this kind of success? Odds are in favor of doing just that. The MANMAN community was built on word of mouth, local and regional user groups and an annual conference.

Not only does Kenandy hope to be able to deliver a full customer list for references (as ASK did for many years), but also has many more tools at its disposal to support that community, including a one-stop customer portal (called the Kenandy Community). Its ability to engage with the community either as a whole, or personally, one customer at a time, has never been more technology-enabled.

Going Cloud is shorthand for leaving older technologies and architectures behind. The Kenandy blog article, which includes a link to the Jutras white paper, asks, "Can you afford to wait to cross the digital divide?" On the other side of the divide, software like Salesforce -- the heartbeat of Kenandy -- makes the cloud seem like a natural evolution of applications that were first built for HP's 3000 iron. If the first generation of 3000 ERP started in the 1970s, the era of Going Cloud brings them into a new generation.

 

08:38 PM in Migration | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 10, 2015

Multiple Parallel Tapes on 3000 Backups

Editor's note: When I saw a request this week for a copy of HP patch MPEMX85A (a patch to STORE that enables Store-To-Disk) for older MPE/iX releases, it brought a storage procedure request to mind.

I'm dealing with some MPE storage processes and need assistance. You would think after storing files on tapes after 10-plus years, we would have found a better way to do this. We use TurboStore with four tape drives and need to find a way to validate the backup. Vstore appears to only have the ability to use one tape drive. Currently I have some empty files scattered through the system and use a separate job to delete them, remount the tapes and restore, trying to access all four drives. 

When using vestore:

vstore [vstorefile] [;filesetlist]

It seems that vstorefile is looking for a file equation similar to:

File t; dev=tape
vstore *t;@.@.@; show

This is why it appears that I can't use more than one tape drive, unless they are in serial, while we want to use four drives in parallel. What method or software should I be using?

Mark Ranft of Pro3K replies:

We always found that DLT 8000 tapes worked well in parallel. When the backup got so big that it wouldn't fit on two DLT 8000 tapes, we split the backup, putting the databases on two tapes in parallel and everything else on a third tape. Keep in mind, we didn't have a backup strategy. We had a recovery strategy and backups were a part of that. We found, for us, organizing backups in this manner allowed us to speed recovery — which was far more important than anything else.

You can achieve good times doing Store-to-Disk backups. But then what? Do you back up the STD to tape and send it offsite? FTP it somewhere? The recovery times on getting this back are too slow.

Tracy Johnson adds

I think you can use VSTORE to read multiple tape drives in parallel or series using the ;RESTORESET parameter.

So you make four file equations.

Drop the beginning file single backreference to a equation (like we learned in olden times), and put the four new ones with the ;RESTORESET= parameter instead. It is one of those things that fooled me first time I saw it, and it took about 10 minutes getting used to seeing it.

The parenthesis around the file equations are placed differently:

Serial:

 ;RESTORESET = (*tape1,*tape2,*tape3,*tape4)

Parallel:

 ;RESTORESET=(*tape1),(*tape2),(*tape3),(*tape4)

But if the tapes were not also created in parallel, it may not help in the latter case.

Ray Legault adds

I use three DLT8000's and run a Vstore every week.

! setvar _drive "(*p1),(*p2),(*p3)"
!#
!vstore ;@.@.@;restoreset=!_drive;show;progress=5;nodecompress
!#

09:35 PM in Hidden Value, Homesteading | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 09, 2015

Managers still linking with 3000 data tools

MB Foster has been holding Wednesday Webinars for years. So far back, in fact, that the first round of webinars appeared less than six weeks after HP announced its drop plans for the 3000 in 2001. Those drop plans might not be working completely as expected, if Foster's response to a new Thursday Webinar is a good measure.

The company has added private Webinars, and it's also setting up by-invitation webinars, too. While we were researching updates on the e-commerce alternatives for 3000 sites, we learned this week's presentation on Thursday covers the UDA Link connectivity software for the HP 3000. Registrations for the guided tour of this software are outpacing the company's general interest The 3 R’s of Migration: Rehost, Replace, Retire.

While UDA Link does run on other servers, its most avid customer base operate their businesses using MPE/iX systems. It's one data marker to show that some system managers are still auditioning tools for 3000s. An invitation to that by-invitation UDA Link webinar is just an e-mail away, a message a manager can send to support@mbfoster.com.

The Wednesday Webinar on those 3 Rs starts at 2 PM Eastern time; a web form on the MB Foster site manages registration for that session.

06:48 PM in Homesteading, Migration | Permalink | Comments (1)

February 06, 2015

How far out can migration assistance lead?

Companies that use Ecometry's ecommerce package have been in transition a long time. Once HP announced in 2001 that the 3000's future was limited at the vendor, Ecometry's campaign to migrate got more intense and focused. After several acquisitions of this software and more than a decade, its customers are still facing some migrations.

GeeseBut some of the customers are looking at a migration beyond just an alternative platform for running Ecometry's successor, JDA Direct Commerce. When IT operations make a transition like this, one kind of destination can be moving to a different vendor's application. Any existing app vendor would be of little help in this kind of move. Then again, the replacement app's vendor might not know enough about a 3000 Ecometry version, or even the Windows Ecometry version that many 3000 sites have embraced.

This kind of migration is one of several that alliance partners assist with. These partners are companies that have experience with implementing and customizing the IT around the application. Sometimes, as in the case of Ability Commerce, they have an alternative ecommerce app like SmartSite and still operate as a partner with Ecometry's latest owners, JDA. A partner brings deeper experience. When there's data to be moved, a company wants to be sure they've got all of it, ready for the new app, safely transformed from its prior incarnation in whatever version of Ecometry it is still running.

AC User SummitSuch IT operations sometimes look for help from a place like MB Foster, which is why the company became a partner with Ability late last year. Ability is hosting its own Ability Commerce User Summit in a month in Delray Beach, Florida. That's the town that used to be the HQ for the old Ecometry. Birket Foster's company will be a sponsor at the Summit. He said his company's work is '"for the standard migration to Ecometry on Windows, or if the customer has a choice of deciding they'll go to something else," he said. "We'd also be able to provide assistance with moving to the Ability Order Management System, for example."

Services companies like Foster's can act like independent insurance agents, or unfettered consulting shops. They'll enable a move off of MPE/iX applications. And sometimes that move can be all way off the existing vendor's alternative apps, and onto another vendor's package. Or in this case, customers can tap a partnership to embrace allied software that will help in a migration.

There's still some isolation for Ecometry sites to endure in this year's JDA lineup. Ability's reads the pulse of Ecometry sites well. But moving all the way off Ecometry is just one option.

Foster said many of the forthcoming migrations off 3000-based Ecometry will go to the Ecometry version for Windows, "because a customer might say that retraining their 400 people in a call center will cost a lot of money." That retraining would be necessary if a site migrated all the way off the existing package. "If the current version of Ecometry is doing the job for you," Foster said, "why would you move? And if you're not moving, you may as well be on the Windows version -- it's not much different to the users than the other version. Your people are familiar with it, and it just gets a fancier interface."

But a consultant working directly for Ecometry -- okay, it's JDA-Red Prairie by now, but under the covers it's still what's left of Ecometry's expertise -- won't be able to carry a migrator beyond JDA's software lineup. At last count JDA had more than 100 software apps in its stable. Some of them might be prospects for a migration away from Ecometry, but probably won't be a fit aimed at ecommerce's needs in specific.

Ability Commerce's SmartSite is aimed directly at the ecommerce operation, rather than a meld of point of sale retail and web sales, better suited for the 200,000 item per day retailers. Many of the large Ecometry sites have catalog sales, plus Web -- but no brick and mortar. The JDA Direct Commerce suite is overkill for some -- especially those who are still making do with their 3000 versions of Ecometry.

In simpler terms, using a replacement app can be a better fit if it doesn't come from an acquiring vendor who's ballooned the scope of the app -- and doesn't have enough focus to feel like the old Ecometry. That flavor of Ecometry, of course, disappeared into its merger with GERS Retail in 2006 to become Escalate Retail. It's been a long time since Ecometry was just focused on web sales and logistics. If you only sell over the Web, where's the good in getting a package with point of sale features?

At some point in any services relationship, an IT manager wants to ask, "What do you recommend?" or perhaps, "We think this might be a better target for our migration. Can you help us get there?" They seek out a migration services company with an independent perspective, matched with explicit knowledge of a current app, platform, and data structures.

08:52 PM in Migration | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 05, 2015

Getting Chromed, and Bad Calls

The HP 3000 made its bones against IBM's business computers, and the wires are alive this week with the fortunes of Big Blue circa 2015. Starting with meetings yesterday, the company is conducting a Resource Action, its euphemism for layoffs. IBM employees call these RAs, but this year's edition is so special -- and perhaps so deep -- it's got a project name. The cutting is dubbed Project Chrome, and so the IBM'ers call getting laid off Getting Chromed.

Excessed Front PageHewlett-Packard has never wanted to call its layoffs by their real name either. The first major HP layoff action during the 3000's watch came in the fall of 1989, when more than 800 of these separations were called "being excessed." Employees had four months to find a new place inside HP, but had to search on their own time. Engineers and support staff were given the option to remain at the company, but jobs at plant guard shacks were among their new career options. Another virulent strain of HP pink slips came in the middle of the last decade, one of the purges in pursuit of better Earnings Per Share that pared away much of the remaining MPE/iX expertise from the vendor.

Aside from bad quarterly reports, these unemployment actions sometimes come in the aftermath of ill-fated corporate acquisitions. This week on CNBC's Squawk Box, analysts identified HP's Compaq merger as one of the worst calls of all time. The subject surfaced after the questionable call that led to a Seattle defeat in Sunday's SuperBowl. A big company's failures in new markets can also be to blame for getting Chromed. IBM has seen its revenues and profits fall over the last year, while mobile and cloud competitors have out-maneuvered Big Blue.

IBM has already shucked off the Cognos development tool PowerHouse as of early last year, but now comes word that other non-IBM software is getting its support pared back in the RA. In the IEEE's digital edition of Spectrum, one commenter made a case for how IBM is sorting out what's getting Chromed. 

I am the last US resource supporting a non-IBM software package, which is in high demand globally -- yet the powers that be seem oblivious to it. Rather than create a dedicated group to go after that business, they cut anyone with that skill, since it is not an IBM product and therefore, "not strategic." Unfortunately the company continues to gamble on their Tivoli products, which clients seem to embrace about as much as Lotus Notes, rabies and bird flu.

The digital article on the IEEE website also includes some reports that employees over 40 have been targeted. They then saw the company threaten to withhold severance packages if age-discrimination lawsuits were filed.

HP and IBM have a lot in common in their workforce makeup. Both employ more than 300,000 workers as of last year, and while those numbers lead the industry, neither is among the top 15 employers worldwide in headcount. However, HP and IBM manufacture goods, so they look up at the largest manufacturing worker employer, Volkwagen. There are 555,000 VW employees.

HP's employee count rose into six digits, and then doubled again, as a result of two acquisitions. Compaq drove the headcount to above 140,000, a 65 percent increase. Then in 2008, EDS became an HP operation, and the headcount soared to 349,000. Since 2011, the workforce at the vendor that's still working to sell some HP 3000 replacements has dropped by 15 percent. The current HP layoff plan — a layoff strategy has been in place for more than five year — calls for a total of 55,000 job eliminations by the end of this fiscal year.

These employee cuts are the result of relentless pursuit of EPS growth, so that the numbers reported to shareholders can show an increase in spite of flat to falling revenues. Stock prices at HP have recovered to 2005 levels amid the HP layoff march. But IBM's share price took a 12 percent dive on a single day this fall, is now below its mark when current CEO Ginni Rommety took over, and hovers today around $160 a share.

Rommety was rewarded for her performance in 2014 with a $1.6 million bonus. The tepid stock of IBM made it "the worst performer in the Dow Jones Industrial Average for a second straight year," according to Bloomberg News. The company that once proudly wore the reputation "nobody ever got fired for buying IBM" is doing a lot of firing this week.

08:53 PM in History, News Outta HP, Newsmakers | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 04, 2015

Checks on MPE's subsystems don't happen

ChecklistOnce we broach a topic here on your digital newsstand, even more information surfaces. Yesterday we reported on the state of HPSUSAN number-checking on 3000 hardware. We figured nobody had ever seen HPSUSAN checks block a startup of MPE itself, so long as the HPCPUNAME information was correct. The HP subsystems, though, those surely got an HPSUSAN check before booting, right?

Not based on what we're hearing since our report. Brian Edminster of Applied Technologies related his experience with HP's policing of things like COBOL II or TurboStore.

I can't claim to be an expert in all things regarding to software licensing methods. But I can tell you from personal experience that none of HP's MPE/iX software subsystems that I've ever administered or used had any sort of HPSUSAN checks built into them. That would include the compilers (such as the BASIC/3000 interpreter and compiler), any of the various levels of the HP STORE software versions, Mirror/iX, Dictionary/3000, BRW, or any of the networking software. (I'll note that the networking software components were quite picky in making sure that compatible versions of the various components were used together, in order for everything to work properly.)

The only time I saw HP-provided software examined using the HPSUSAN was when server hardware was upgraded. It checked the CPU upgrades, or number of CPUs in a chassis.

Like several of our other sources, Edminster knows that the third-party providers, especially the big-name players, use HPSUSAN to make sure that vendor knows where its software is booting up. Because of those exacting checks, "You've got to have some sort of plan in place to cover having to use any alternate hardware for disaster recovery," he reports, "and still expect to have your third party tools work beyond a limited time-frame."

But there's no dissenting story out there regarding what's ethical to do with intent about respecting software checks and licensing. There are always such possibilities for managers who live outside the lines. And sometimes it might be an oversight. As an example, O'Pin Systems -- a first-issue advertiser in the 3000 Newswire more than 19 years ago -- still has Reveal customers out in the MPE world relying on that reporting tool.

One such site was having a hard time with a boot-up on a different MPE/iX server. A START command to Reveal's RSPCNTL will stream a job, but RSPCNTL would terminate before a prompt was given. "I think this may indicate that the product is not validated on the new machine -- which would require re-validation," a former developer for O'Pin told us. "I don't recall exactly what's checked, but the variables HPSUSAN and HPCPUNAME are almost certainly checked for a match. VAR OPINSERIAL will appear to be set to 0, if RSPCONTROL determines that there is a validation fault."

Re-validation can be a matter of placing a call to the vendor's support line -- if there's anyone left on the vendor's staff who understands that the company still has an MPE/iX product in the field. O'Pin has such a support staffer.

Edminster had a cogent comment about this need for this validation during an era when 3000 outposts are shrinking.

I'm don't propose that software purchased for one system be moved to another, unless that's within the bounds of the original software agreements. Just because a vendor has stopped selling a product, or stops pursuing license violations of that product, doesn't make the product freeware.

It also does not make that product yours to use as though you owned it.

Most software was 'sold' with a 'right to use' license. That doesn't mean you own it, now or ever. It means that you are licensed to use it under the terms in the original contract, or as amended since.

That may sound like splitting hairs. But as intellectual property goes, it can make the difference between being able to make a living on the fruits of your work, or not.

08:29 PM in Homesteading, User Reports | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 03, 2015

Software That Checks Who Is Using It

Detective-with-magnifying-glassHP 3000s have been outfitted with unique identity numbers for decades. In the '90s a scandal arose around hardware resellers who were committing fraud with modified system IDs. People were jailed, fines were paid, and HP made the 3000 world safe for authorized resellers. Until it crashed its 3000 futures and those resellers' businesses two years later. We've not heard if those fines or jail terms were rolled back. 

It's probably not fair to think they would be, since those resellers stole something while they fabricated ID numbers. That sort of fraud may still be possible. We heard a question last week about what sort of checking would ever be done regarding the HPSUSAN number. In the recently-curtailed emulator freeware model, an enthusiast could type in an HPSUSAN they avowed they had the right to use. Verification of that number wasn't part of the process. This is called the honor system.

The question: Did HP ever check HPSUSAN numbers, and what format would they have to be in? Is it like a 16-digit credit card number and expiration date checksum?

"There are only digits, no letters," said a veteran of the HP SE service, one who's worked for many third party vendors as well. "I don’t think there any certain number of digits. I don’t think HP ever checked the HPSUSAN, only the third parties."

The question came up as the process of upgrading a 3000 was on the discussion docket last week. (You bet, some people are still upgrading 3000s. Some are upgrading to an emulation/virtualized 3000.)

Me, I don't believe that using any number that didn't match HP's issued list of HPSUSANs would prevent MPE from booting up. The off-the-shelf apps and the things like Powerhouse, not so., though. They don't start if the HPSUSAN doesn't match that software. Probably the HP subsystems like COBOL and TurboStore would check for a number, too.

This starts to matter as MPE software rolls forward, off old servers where it's been registered and onto bigger, newer 3000s. Maybe support has been dropped in cost-saving measures. (Not a savings if you ever have a vendor-caliber software failure.) Given their support-less existence, some 3000 sites want to keep a low profile about where their software is heading. There are vendors left in the world who'll try to collect 3000 license upgrade fees, based on usage tiers for a server which HP hasn't built for more than 11 years.

Every company is entitled to charge what's in the contract, of course. How effective is that practice? It depends. Does a failure to pay a license fee push the software's user away from the vendor? We hear about emulator prospects who add up their licensing upgrade costs and have to delay their migration to the virtualized 3000 they desire.

HPSUSAN is an important number that third party software verifies, checking to see who's using it. Stromasys will be providing a new way to secure HPSUSAN numbers once it installs some cloud-based Charon emulators. A dongle, currently the key to using Charon, doesn't float into the cloud easily. Maybe Rackspace can make an exception, but Stromasys says it's working to eliminate the dongle requirement.

Clouds are important to keeping the cost of MPE computing low, because hosting an emulator requires beefy Intel hardware to run as fast as a 3000. The faster the better, says Stromasys Product Manager Doug Smith. Charon HPA in the cloud lowers cost of ownership, but it'll require putting HPSUSAN up there, too. MPE probably won't check if it's the right HPSUSAN. But as soon as you fire up HP COBOL, or another subsystem, or third party software, that'll need to be the correct number.

07:59 PM in Homesteading | Permalink | Comments (0)

February 02, 2015

HP's new roster: same minds, old mission

HP has announced its new management lineup for the split company, but many key positions for the refocused Hewlett-Packard Enterprise won't change in the reorganization. Hewlett-Packard Enterprise is the name for the corporation that will sell, support and even develop the HP suggested replacements for the HP 3000. Customers who invested in HP's Unix servers, or even those using HP's ProLiants as Linux hosts, will care about who's leading that new company.

But those customers won't have to spend a great deal of time tracking new faces. Current HP CEO Meg Whitman will head the company that promises to increase its focus on enterprise computing, the kind that HP 3000s have done for decades. While reading the tea leaves and doing the Kremlinology for the heads of HP computer operations, the following leaders are unchanged:

  • Cathie Lesjak will be the Chief Financial Officer
  • John Schultz will be the General Counsel
  • Henry Gomez will be the Chief Marketing and Communications Officer
  • John Hinshaw will be the Chief Customer Officer and lead Technology & Operations
  • Martin Fink will be the Chief Technology Officer and lead Hewlett-Packard Labs

Veghte-1-72While remaining as the General Manager of Enterprise Group, Bill Veghte will lead the Hewlett-Packard Enterprise separation efforts. He's not doing a small job now. The Enterprise group is a $28 billion annual revenue business that includes server, storage, networking, technology services, and cloud solutions. Giving him transition duties is reminiscent of the days when leading the HP 3000 operations as GM had devolved into a part-time job, shared with the GM duties of HP's Business Intelligence Unit. It's different this time; there's a second-in-command who'll manage the Enterprise Group operations in this year of transition.

With HP's Labs, Enterprise chiefs, and the head of the boardroom table all the same, it will be interesting to see what changes get managed with the old team. HP will have an old mission, too -- very old, from the era before it heard the siren song of consumer computing. 3000 customers used to wish for an HP that was marketing-savvy. When that HP arrived, it seemed to quickly forget the 3000. There was a renaissance in the 3000 thinking and plans from Roy Breslawski in marketing, and Harry Sterling as GM. But Sterling was then handed Business Intelligence GM duties alongside his 3000 mission. Within a couple of years after Sterling retired, the 3000 was out on the chopping block.

Nobody knows what will be excised from the Hewlett-Packard Enterprise that's going to have to get even leaner as a smaller entity. But at least that Enterprise won't be spending a lot to lure new executives with fat recruiting packages like the one given to Mark Hurd. That was at the peak of the consumer pursuit at HP. Some might call it the nadir, from an enterprise computing perspective.

08:43 PM in Migration, News Outta HP | Permalink | Comments (0)